Promoting Canadian Oats

Rising incomes in developing world spurring demand for food, dietary changes

Strong crop yields, higher productivity and slower growth in global demand should contribute to a gradual decline in real prices for agricultural products over the coming decade, but nonetheless, prices will likely remain at levels above those in the early-2000s, according to the latest Agricultural Outlook report produced by the OECD and FAO.

Lower oil prices will contribute to lower food prices, by pushing energy and fertilizer costs down, and removing incentives for the production of first-generation biofuels made from food crops.

Read the full story at fao.org.

Barley and oat farmers have joined Grain Farmers of Ontario, which also represents the provinces corn, soybean, and wheat farmers. Read the press release.

New category of "gluten-free" claims allowed for specially produced oats

To mark Celiac Awareness Month, the Honourable Rona Ambrose, Minister of Health today announced changes that will result in more safe food choices for Canadians with celiac disease by approving "gluten-free" claims on specially produced oats and foods containing these oats.

Gluten-containing grains such as wheat, rye and barley are widely used in the production of many foods. People with celiac disease must avoid eating the gluten protein found in these grains to manage their condition. In the case of oats, normal agricultural practices can result in the unintended presence of small amounts gluten from other grains. However, recent evidence shows that oats can safely be consumed by the majority of people with celiac disease, as long as they have been produced and processed to avoid cross-contamination by gluten from other cereals. Health Canada will now allow specially produced oats with trace amounts of gluten to carry a "gluten-free" claim.

The purpose of this survey, being conducted by a Masters candidate at McMaster University in Hamilton, ON, is to investigate the management of sponsorships within Canadian agribusiness. She hopes to understand how agribusinesses can best communicate their sponsorship activity to farmer customers. The results will be reviewed for any themes and best practices.

For every farmer survey submitted, she will give $1 to 4-H Canada, up to $1000.

The survey will not ask for any personal information and participation cannot be tracked. Participants can stop or withdraw from the survey without responses being collected. Please note, however, that once the survey is submitted it will be impossible to withdraw survey answers since they will be submitted anonymously. This study has been reviewed and cleared by the McMaster Research Ethics Board.

Click to take the survey.

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