Research Strategy

Research is a core function of the POGA. Working collaboratively with other partners and research organizations, POGA seeks to leverage research investment dollars to increase profitability of oat production for Prairie growers.

Through 2021, the three provincial associations in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, and Prairie oat growers have turned $3.9 M of levy dollars into $27.4 M which is means growers in Western Canada have contributed less than 15 cents of every dollar spent on research and marketing.

National Oat Research Strategy 2018–2023

Prepared with the support of the Government of Saskatchewan, Industry Organization Development Fund, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, and The Prairie Oat Growers Association.

SUMMARY

Oats are a vital part of the Canadian cropping rotation. Canada is the largest exporter of oats in the world and has a premier reputation for quality production. This success is underpinned by good research, so a National Research Strategy for Oats has been developed with all parts of the value chain involved.

POGA Research Projects


No category.

Research Topic: Marketing

  • Project Status: In Progress
  • Principal Investigators: funded in part by AAFC and Manitoba Ag in Action, and directed by POGA through Emerging Ag
  • Project Dates: April 2021 – March 2023
  • Abstract/Summary: POGA sought to target domestic consumers in this campaign to further diversify the demand for Canadian oats. Canadian consumption of oats has been steadily increasing over the years. However oats are still perceived as a breakfast cereal rather than an ingredient to be used in food for the rest of the day. It is important to educate Canadians on the health benefits for things such as heart disease, high cholesterol, obesity and diabetes to name a few. There is an increasing desire to eat “local” as well to reduce the environmental footprint related to the transportation of goods. The website “Oats Everyday”, which was developed as a promotional campaign to the USA, is reactivated and geared to Canadian consumers (and materials will be supplied in both French and English).
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Research Topic: Marketing

  • Project Status: In Progress
  • Principal Investigators: Funded in part by AAFC and directed by POGA through Emerging Ag
  • Project Dates: April 2021 – March 2023
  • Abstract/Summary: The intent is to increase demand for Canadian oats by promoting the health benefits of oats to the Japanese market. Japan is the fourth largest importer of oats globally, and Canada has been the leading exporter of oats in recent years. Canada is the largest supplier of raw oats in Japan; however the goal is to gain market share in the human-consumption arena. The campaign is focused on trade advocacy, as well as social media outreach to highlight the nutrition and health benefits of oats in daily diets
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Research Topic: Marketing

  • Project Status: In Progress
  • Principal Investigators: Funded in part by AAFC and directed by POGA through Emerging Ag
  • Project Dates: April 2021 – March 2023
  • Abstract/Summary: Mexico is the third largest importer of oats globally and several other Latin American countries who import oats could offer additional opportunities for Canadian exports. A long-term strategy for POGA is to make use of the proximity to these markets, and build on the strong Canadian reputation for products in Mexico which would support the efforts to differentiate Canadian oats. This project focuses on diversification of Canadian oat exports to Mexico. The activities aim to increase per capita consumption of oats, increase Canadian oat exports to Mexico, and increase consumer awareness of the health benefits of oats. Since this project began in 2015, Canada has been able to more than triple its oat exports to Mexico.
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Research Topic: Intercropping/Other

  • Project Status: In Progress
  • Principal Investigators: Dr. Myriam Fernandez, AAFC
  • Project Dates: April 2019 – March 2024
  • Abstract/Summary: This project will look at the relationship between various intercrop dynamics to see where benefits can occur. Intercrop species use soil available nutrients and soil moisture, and at given times inter- and intra-competition are expected. Specifically, the project will look to determine if intercrops with crops or a living mulch can reduce weeds compared to sole crops and will look at various seeding ratios to evaluate impact on each crop. It will aim to identify if there is a nitrogen benefit from legumes in the intercrop to its companion crop, as well as look to determine the biomass and grain yield/quality due to the intercrop dynamics. It will also look at the disease pressures, and evaluate if intercrops have less disease than monocrops, as well as develop crop growth and nutrient models for intercrop verses monocrop scenarios.
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Research Topic: Intercropping/Other

  • Project Status: Completed
  • Principal Investigators: Lana Shaw, South East Research Farm (SERF), Garry Hnatowich, Jessica Pratchler, Robin Lokken, and Chris Holzapfel, Brian Nybo
  • Project Dates: 2019 – 2021
  • Abstract/Summary: This project will look at how to grow oat and pea together as a grain crop, how to separate grain components using slotted screens, and the effect of varying oat seeding rates in intercrop with pea on yield and agronomic parameters.Peas and oats are both relatively low value crops in the rotation compared withcanola. They are both beneficial to have in a crop rotation in terms of nitrogen useefficiency and mycorrhizal associations. Intercropping oats and pea in a mixed graincrop may result in a more resilient and valuable product with reduced need forherbicides and nitrogen fertilizer. Oat may have beneficial effects on pea disease orreduce weed pressure, which has implications for herbicide-resistant weeds like kochia. An oat-pea intercrop may be agronomically and economically suitable for many of thecrop zones found in Saskatchewan. An intercrop may reduce the need for glyphosate applications by reducing weed competition and may also improve soil aggregate stability. This project is funded by the ADOPT program.
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Research Topic: Fertility/Climate/Environment

4R Management: Right Rate and Placement for Fertilizer in Oats

  • Project Status: In Progress
  • Principal Investigators: Northeast Agriculture Research Foundation (NARF).
  • Project Dates: April 2022-February 2023
  • Abstract/Summary: The purpose of this demonstration is to highlight the impact of fertilizer placement and rate on oat establishment, seed yields and quality. Oat response to various macronutrients has been investigated, and research has shown that oats are responsive to additions of nitrogen and sometimes phosphate. Prior research has not included different fertilizer placement methods. Some research in this area has been done on wheat, showing different responses and impacts from various placements. The intention is to demonstrate different fertilizer placements at seeding, and determine where or not these affect plant stands, yields, or crop quality. This project is funded by ADOPT.

Research Topic: Fertility/Climate/Environment

  • Project Status: In Progress
  • Principal Investigators: Mike Hall, through AgriARM
  • Project Dates: April 2022 – Feb 2023
  • Abstract/Summary: The objective of this project is to demonstrate the response of a modern oat varieties to the historically recommended rate of 60 lb N /ac against the more recently suggested recommendation of 90 lb N/ac, and to determine the relative importance of adding phosphorus (P), potassium (K) and sulphur (S) for these different nitrogen (N) recommendations in eastern Saskatchewan. The influence of treatment on oat yield, lodging and test weight will be determined. This project is funded by the ADOPT program.
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Research Topic: Variety/Trials

Oat Lodging: Identifying key root and shoots traits for improved standability

  • Project Status: In Progress
  • Principal Investigators: Dr. Aaron Beattie, CDC
  • Project Dates: April 2022 – March 2025
  • Abstract/Summary: This project will evaluate root system architecture in oat cultivars which vary in lodging resistance. It will evaluate stem and root lodging in field trials; assess impact of seeding rate on key stem and root lodging-related traits; assess the correlation between various root phenotyping methods; and compare root system architecture between Canadian oat germplasm and a diverse set of oat germplasm. Lodging and mechanical failure of the stem or root system is a significant issue for oats, leading to yield reductions for producers. Identifying root and stem traits important for lodging resistance will lead to enhancements in breeding cultivars with high standability. This project is co-funded by the Saskatchewan Agriculture Development Fund (ADF).

Research Topic: Variety/Trials

Oat varietal response to plant growth regulators

  • Project Status: In Progress
  • Principal Investigators: Brianne McInnes at the Northeast Agriculture Research Foundation (NARF) and Chris Holzapfel at Indian Head Agricultural Research (IHARF)
  • Project Dates: April 2022 – February 2023
  • Abstract/Summary: This project will look at the responses of different oat milling varieties to applications ofthe registered plant growth regulators (PGRs) Moddus and Manipulator. Through previous research, both products have been found to decrease plant height, which diminishes the risk of lodging in cereal crops. Lodging has the potential to cause yield losses of 7-35% in cereal crops and can subsequently lead to significant reductions in grain quality. Plant height in oats is often increased with enhanced fertility as more available N results in more rapid plant growth. It is suspected that different varieties will respond differently to PGR applications as a result of different genetics for yield, lodging, and height characteristics.

Research Topic: Variety/Trials

  • Project Status: Completed
  • Principal Investigators: Mike Hall, through AgriARM (Applied Research Management)
  • Project Dates: April 2021 – February 2022
  • Abstract/Summary: Many oat millers will no longer accept oats treated with pre-harvest glyphosate. Losing this harvest management tool forces many producers to leave oats standing in the field longer, creating a greater risk of poorer grain quality and higher harvest lost.The objective of this project is to help producers select milling oat varieties that are more likely to maintain yield and grain quality when harvested late. Lodging, shatter loss, grain quality and yield between six commonly grown milling oats will be compared between ideal and late harvest timings. This project is funded by the Saskatchewan Agriculture Demonstration of Practices and Technologies (ADOPT) program.
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Research Topic: Oat Breeding

  • Project Status: In Progress
  • Principal Investigators: Dr. Kirby Nilsen, AAFC Brandon Research Centre
  • Project Dates: April 2018 –March 2023
  • Abstract/Summary: Developing milling quality oat cultivars suitable for organic production in western Canada, and potentially across Canada. Dr. Nilsen will evaluate and identify germplasm with high levels of genetically conferred disease resistance, and develop oat cultivars with durable resistance, especially to oat rusts, with acceptable milling qualitysuitable for organically managed production systems in western Canada, and for the ever-increasing organic markets.
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Research Topic: Oat Breeding

  • Project Status: In Progress
  • Principal Investigators: Jim Dyck, Oat Advantage
  • Project Dates: August 2021 – July 2026
  • Abstract/Summary: This private breeding facility has supplied five new oat varieties for the Prairie provinces which contribute to over 200,000 oat acres. This research project is targeting a 10% higher bushel weight, low hull content, high protein, harvest durability, and ultimately high yielding and valued oat varieties. Heavy oats are a focus for Oat Advantage, as the improvement on weight is expected to yield benefits in transportation and storage.
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