Insect/Disease/Weeds

Research Topic: Insect/Disease/Weeds / New

  • Project Status: In Progress
  • Principal Investigators: Paul Bullock (University of Manitoba) and Randy Kutcher (University of Saskatchewan)
  • Project Dates: April 2018 - March 2023
  • Abstract/Summary: Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a fungal disease affecting cereal crops in Canada that reduces productivity and produces mycotoxins in the grain. This fungal disease is caused by a number of Fusarium species of which Fusarium graminearum is considered the most important because of its abundance, its toxin producing ability and its impact on grain quality and yield. Currently the most important practices recommended to cereal growers for FHB management include non-host crops in the rotation, resistant cultivars, and application of fungicides.

    Cultural management of FHB of cereals, in particular crop rotation or the sequence of crops grown, can play a major role in an integrated management approach to FHB (Gilbert and Haber 2013), as well as many other pest and agronomic issues. However, there are no studies in Canada that clearly indicate the impact on FHB of various cereals due to the previous crop(s) cultivated.

    The goal of this research is to improve yield and quality in Canada through the implementation of effective crop sequences to mitigate FHB.
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Research Topic: Insect/Disease/Weeds

  • Project Status: Completed
  • Principal Investigators: Sheryl A. Tittlemier, Richard Blagden, Jason Chan, Mike Roscoe, Kerri Pleskach
  • Abstract/Summary: This project was a collaborative venture with funding contributed by the Canadian Grain Commission, the Prairie Oat Growers Association, the Saskatchewan Ministry of Agriculture, and the Canada-Saskatchewan Growing Forward 2 bi-lateral agreement.
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Research Topic: Insect/Disease/Weeds

  • Project Status: Completed
  • Abstract/Summary: Over the four years (2014-2017) that field surveys were conducted in commercial oat fields to evaluate the prevalence of oat leaf blotch pathogens P. avenae was the most often identified, being present in 59% of the 160 fields surveyed. Cochliobolus sativus was present in 23% of surveyed fields while S. avenae was only identified in 3% of fields. The ranking prevalence of these pathogens was consistent across all four years and differs from prior surveys conducted where S. avenae was observed in all years and with greater prevalence than C. sativus in most years (2011-2013).
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Research Topic: Insect/Disease/Weeds

  • Project Status: Completed
  • Abstract/Summary: The study takes a look at the occurrence of toxigenic Fusarium and Penicillium fungi and their associated mycotoxins, and an investigation of the fate of Fusarium and Penicillium species and their associated mycotoxins during processing of oats.
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Research Topic: Insect/Disease/Weeds

  • Project Status: Completed
  • Abstract/Summary: This study is led by Food and Consumer Products of Canada and a summary of the results will be posted when available. Please read the PDF (below) to learn more about mycotoxin prevention, based on the results of this study.
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Research Topic: Insect/Disease/Weeds

  • Project Status: In Progress
  • Principal Investigators: Dr. Aaron Beattie Crop Development Centre (CDC) - Saskatoon, SK
  • Project Dates: April 2019 - March 2023
  • Abstract/Summary: To build on Western Canada’s position as a supplier of premium quality oats to the current US markets, and developing markets like Mexico and China, requires developing varieties with a strong disease resistance package (of which crown rust resistance is a critical component). This will provide value to growers, through improved yield and reduced input costs (i.e. reduced fungicide use) which will help oat remain a viable crop within a grower’s rotation, and to millers/food processors, through higher selectability (i.e. good plumpness and test weight).
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Research Topic: Insect/Disease/Weeds

  • Project Status: Completed
  • Principal Investigators: Dr. Shaun Sharpe with AAFC
  • Project Dates: April 2021 – Feb 2022
  • Abstract/Summary: The study objective is to characterize the dose response, interaction, and optimal mix of potassium nitrate and pyroligneous acid (liquid smoke) to determine the suitability of either pre-seeding or post-harvest germination stimulation of wild oat, volunteer barley, oats, and wheat. Wild oat is a strong competitor and can cause significant yield loss when emerging prior to cereals. The development of herbicide resistance in wild oats results in additional herbicide inputs and costs, as well as standard practices to control wild oat.
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