Variety/Trials

Research Topic: Variety/Trials

  • Project Status: Completed
  • Principal Investigators: Dr. Chris Willenborg, Dr. Nancy Ames, Eric Johnson, Moria Kurtenbach, Sid Darras
  • Project Dates: May 1, 2016 to December 1, 2019
  • Abstract/Summary: Applying glyphosate or swathing at or above 50% SMC has negative effects on seed quality and therefore end use capabilities. When treatments were swathed at or above 60%, there is a risk that beta-glucan levels can drop below 3%, the percentage groat will decline, which ultimately impacts milling yield and increases the amount of wastage during the milling process. Compared to direct combining without glyphosate, there appears to be no effect on oat quality when glyphosate is applied ≤40% SMC. Across all site years, oat cultivar did not have as much of an impact as the other two factors (i.e. seeding rate and harvest method) did. Increasing seeding rates resulted in a reduction in SMC at harvest, lower TKWs, and softer groats. Overall Pinnacle was less affected by changes in harvest method in regards to percent plump and thin kernels. CDC Dancer had an increase in thin kernels and a decrease in plump kernels when plots were swathed. Using glyphosate as a harvest method has no more of a negative impact than swathing on oat yield or seed quality, regardless of seeding rate or cultivar used. It is plausible that pre-harvest glyphosate had a greater impact on perennial weed control than in-season herbicides used. Dandelion populations were generally higher when a post-emergent herbicide was used alone. View the PDF below for final report.
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Research Topic: Variety/Trials

  • Project Status: In Progress
  • Principal Investigators: Government of Alberta
  • Project Dates: 2018 - ongoing
  • Abstract/Summary: This Alberta Regional Variety trial is lead by the Government of Alberta. For any additional information please contact the Government of Alberta.
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Research Topic: Variety/Trials

  • Project Status: Completed
  • Principal Investigators: Xiao Qiu
  • Abstract/Summary: Avenanthramides are a group of N-cinnamolyanthranilic acids comprising anthranilic acid and cinnamic acid connected by an amide linkage with health-promoting properties mainly found in oat (Avena sativa L.). In this research, avenanthramide A, B and C (Avn-A, B and C), the three most abundant avenanthramides (Avns) in oat, were identified and quantified from oat varieties. Subsequently, in vitro antioxidant activities of oat extracts and Avn-A, B and C were evaluated, and Avn-C had the highest in vitro antioxidant activity among the three avenanthramides. To investigate the cytoprotective activity of Avns, normal human skin fibroblasts (2DD) were treated with Avn C followed by exposure to extracellular stress and its ability to reduce cellular damage was determined. Pre-treatment of cells with Avn-C reduced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress significantly as demonstrated by decreased intracellular free radical levels and antioxidant gene transcripts. Avn-C pre-treatment also resulted in decreased levels of gene transcripts encoding pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to H2O2 or tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) stimulation. This reduction in cytokine gene transcription occurred concomitantly with reduced phosphorylated nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65, indicating reduced pro-inflammatory response. To better understand the mechanisms of actions, the impact of Avn-C on cellular signaling pathways was investigated on Avn C-treated 2DD cells without exposure to stress. Avn-C was found to induce heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression through increased DNA-Nrf2 binding activity. Also, it reduced basal levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines through decreased DNA-NF-κB binding activity. Moreover, anti-proliferative effect of Avn C on 2DD cells was observed via mechanisms independent of autophagy activation. Collectively, our findings suggest that Avn-C protects normal human skin fibroblasts against oxidative stress and inflammatory response through Nrf2/HO-1 activation and NF-κB inhibition.
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Research Topic: Variety/Trials

  • Project Status: Completed
  • Abstract/Summary: The objective of this project was to generate data showing levels of key nutrient components in oats from a variety of international sources, particularly to see how Canadian oats compare.
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Research Topic: Variety/Trials

  • Project Status: Completed
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Research Topic: Variety/Trials

Oat Lodging: Identifying key root and shoots traits for improved standability

  • Project Status: In Progress
  • Principal Investigators: Dr. Aaron Beattie, CDC
  • Project Dates: April 2022 – March 2025
  • Abstract/Summary: This project will evaluate root system architecture in oat cultivars which vary in lodging resistance. It will evaluate stem and root lodging in field trials; assess impact of seeding rate on key stem and root lodging-related traits; assess the correlation between various root phenotyping methods; and compare root system architecture between Canadian oat germplasm and a diverse set of oat germplasm. Lodging and mechanical failure of the stem or root system is a significant issue for oats, leading to yield reductions for producers. Identifying root and stem traits important for lodging resistance will lead to enhancements in breeding cultivars with high standability. This project is co-funded by the Saskatchewan Agriculture Development Fund (ADF).

Research Topic: Variety/Trials

Oat varietal response to plant growth regulators

  • Project Status: In Progress
  • Principal Investigators: Brianne McInnes at the Northeast Agriculture Research Foundation (NARF) and Chris Holzapfel at Indian Head Agricultural Research (IHARF)
  • Project Dates: April 2022 – February 2023
  • Abstract/Summary: This project will look at the responses of different oat milling varieties to applications ofthe registered plant growth regulators (PGRs) Moddus and Manipulator. Through previous research, both products have been found to decrease plant height, which diminishes the risk of lodging in cereal crops. Lodging has the potential to cause yield losses of 7-35% in cereal crops and can subsequently lead to significant reductions in grain quality. Plant height in oats is often increased with enhanced fertility as more available N results in more rapid plant growth. It is suspected that different varieties will respond differently to PGR applications as a result of different genetics for yield, lodging, and height characteristics.

Research Topic: Variety/Trials

  • Project Status: Completed
  • Principal Investigators: Mike Hall, through AgriARM (Applied Research Management)
  • Project Dates: April 2021 – February 2022
  • Abstract/Summary: Many oat millers will no longer accept oats treated with pre-harvest glyphosate. Losing this harvest management tool forces many producers to leave oats standing in the field longer, creating a greater risk of poorer grain quality and higher harvest lost.The objective of this project is to help producers select milling oat varieties that are more likely to maintain yield and grain quality when harvested late. Lodging, shatter loss, grain quality and yield between six commonly grown milling oats will be compared between ideal and late harvest timings. This project is funded by the Saskatchewan Agriculture Demonstration of Practices and Technologies (ADOPT) program.
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